2013 Nature’s Best Photography Windland Smith Rice International Awards competition

The editors of Nature’s Best Photography magazine invite all photographers to enter the 2013 Nature’s Best Photography Windland Smith Rice International Awards competition. Start an entry in the 2013 competition. It is easy to enter, fun to participate, and life-changing if you are selected as a winner! CLICK HERE TO ENTER:

2013NBP_WSRAwards_ContestDeadline

Category Winners and a selection of Highly Honored photographs will be displayed in a large format exhibition at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History, one of the most widely respected and highly visited museums in the world. In addition, all winning images will be published in the Fall/Winter 2013 Special Collectors’ Edition of NATURE’S BEST PHOTOGRAPHY magazine and promoted around the globe.

ENTRY FEE and ENTRY FORM: If mailed, a check or money order for $25 (US dollars only—no foreign checks) must be included with your entry, made out to: NATURE’S BEST PHOTOGRAPHY. Or you may use a Visa, MasterCard, or American Express charge card on your Entry Form, or phone in your information to 703-467-9783. Each submission must be accompanied by an Entry Form with information clearly filled out. See the Entry Guidelines PDF.

ENTER ONLINE OR SEND BY MAIL TO:
Nature’s Best Photography
Windland Awards 2013
1877-C Metro Center Drive
Reston, Virginia 20190 USA
Phone 703-467-9783; Fax 703-467-9785

QUESTIONS OR NEED HELP? Email: Awards@naturesbestphotography.com
or call 703-467-9783 during office hours Monday-Friday 9am -5pm or leave a message.

Judging begins after the contest closes in May, and entries will be reviewed in the order the account was opened. So the earlier you enter, the earlier your images will be reviewed by the judges! Check out the categories and guidelines and give us a call or email if you have questions.

CATEGORIES:

AFRICAN WILDLIFE: (SPONSORED BY THE AFRICAN WILDLIFE FOUNDATION) Wild animals (mammals, birds, reptiles, amphibians, etc.) photographed on the African continent including Madagascar and offshore island groups, taken in their natural habitat.
ANIMAL ANTICS: Wildlife in humorous or surprising situations.
ART IN NATURE: Naturally occurring artistic compositions (colors, forms, textures, etc.) in nature.
BIRDS: Wild birds in native habitats displaying plumage, mating rituals, nesting, feeding, or other behaviors.
CONSERVATION PHOTOGRAPHER OF THE YEAR: Nominate a CPY recipient at www.naturesbestphotography.com/competition_conservation.php
ENDANGERED SPECIES: Plants or animals that are listed as Vulnerable, Threatened, or Endangered Species by the IUCN. Please visit www.iucnredlist.org to confirm the endangered status of a species before submitting to this category.
LANDSCAPES: Dramatic scenes and unusual perspectives of wild places providing expansive views. Includes plant life: flowers, trees, and other flora in natural habitat.
OCEANS:
(SPONSORED IN MEMORY OF OCEAN EXPLORER AND SUPPORTER, STEVE DROGIN) The fascinating world of the sea: tide pools, coral reefs, marine life, waves, etc. Photos taken above the ocean’s surface, related to ocean life or landscapes, are also welcome.
(NEW) OUTDOOR ADVENTURE: People enjoying the outdoors: Adventurers, backpackers, kayakers, divers, hikers, climbers, sitting around the campfire, caving, skiing, running, skydiving, etc., in natural settings.
POWER OF NATURE:
(SPONSORED BY THE HOWARD G. BUFFETT FOUNDATION) Dramatic images that illustrate the power of nature, from hurricanes, tornadoes, storms, flooding, earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, landslides, and more. We are also looking for the aftermath, displaying what is left after these natural events, to the rescue, cleanup, and recovery that follows. We may also select a sequence of submitted images that cover the entire story behind a particular event.
SMALL WORLD:
Shots of plants, animals, and miniature landscapes taken with close-up lenses.
WILDLIFE:
Wild animals (mammals, reptiles, amphibians, etc. — Birds are a separate category, see above) photographed within their natural habitat anywhere in the world outside of Africa. (NOTE: No captive animals allowed in this category.)
YOUTH PHOTOGRAPHER OF THE YEAR:
(SPONSORED BY BROOKE MORROW FOR ST. MARY’S EPISCOPAL SCHOOL) An entry of up to 20 photographs may be submitted by photographers 18 years of age or younger. Each individual image in a youth submission must fit within the contest categories, without exception. NOTE: Please be sure to include your date of birth and current age on your entry form.
ZOOS & AQUARIUMS:
Images may include animal portraits, behavior, zookeepers working with animals, visitors (may require model release), special events, etc. All photographs must have been taken at zoos and aquariums belonging to and accredited by American Zoo Association (AZA) or the World Association of Zoos & Aquaria (WAZA). Please check the complete AZA list at www.aza.org and the complete WAZA list at www.waza.org.

Enter today to be judged first. Good luck!
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Flickr Photo Review – Image by Buck Shreck – Buffalo (Happy Holidays!)

Below is an image submitted by one of our flickr members, Buck Shreck, of a Buffalo in the spirit of the holidays.

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  • Notes From the Field: “I had moved down to Montana for 1 year over 2010 and 2011. During that time I was going to Yellowstone almost every day and it made for some very interesting shot opportunities. On this particular day, I noticed a herd of Buffalo down in the bottom. As luck would have it, they started to come up the mountain side single file through the deep snow. I knew that as they crested the snow bank I was very likely to get some unique shot opportunities. I checked their direction and positioned myself to be in front of them as they came up over the snow bank. Most of them as they topped the snow bank, saw me and cut off to either side, nice shots but not quite what I was looking for. I wanted one cresting the top in my direction. My patience was rewarded when this big bull came straight over the snow bank, with the snow flying. The shot was exactly what I had planned.
    The shot was taken on 01/22/2011
    Focal Length: 105 mm
    F. Stop: 4.5
    Exposure time: 1/1250” – Buck Shreck

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Flickr Photo Review – Image by Pal Teravagimov – Waterbuck

Below is an image submitted by one of our flickr members, Pal Teravagimov, of a Waterbuck at Lake Nakuru.

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Editor’s Review:

“Eye contact with the subject brings a special connection to any photograph, but this image also provides a dramatic view of the waterbuck and the symmetrical balance of the markings on its face, ears, and horns.” – Steve Freligh

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Flickr Photo Review – Image by Mark Chandler – Ladybird

Below is an image submitted by one of our flickr members, Mark Chandler, entitled “The Great Ladybird Escape.”

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  • Notes From the Field: “I called the image, The Great Ladybird Escape because It was taken on my glass patio table in my back garden, which is in Wolverhampton. I had been taking macro photo’s of insects when it began to rain. I was walking in when I saw the ladybird running for cover from the rain too! It was running through small puddles and I couldn’t resist taking the shot.
    I sharpened the image slightly and used layers in Photoshop CS5. I then cropped the image to remove a glass candle holder which the insect was running too to escape the rain.
    The kit I used may seem odd. I used a Canon 5d mkii, with a 70-200mm lens, but had a Canon close up attachment. It works really well, although, I would love a dedicated macro lens as it is great fun. The shot was taken in RAW, at IOS – 1000, Exposure –0.3step, 1/3200 sec, F/5. The shot was taken quickly, but luckily for me I had just been shooting fast moving insects so the camera took good advantage. I did not use a tripod, I didnt have time, so the photo was taken with the camera resting on my hand which was on the wet glass.” – Mark Chandler


Editor’s Review:

“Simple lines often provide the best composition. The added highlight of the red color and dotted pattern on the body of this ladybug, along with the off center positioning makes this an image I enjoy viewing. It also reminds me how strong this ladybug must be to face the elements as well as predators at every turn!” – Steve Freligh

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Flickr Photo Review – Image by Andrew Snyder – Snake

Below is an image submitted by one of our flickr members, Andrew Snyder.

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No use without photographer’s permission under any circumstances.

Visit Andrew Snyder’s flickr photostream

  • Notes From the Field: “I spent two months this summer surveying the Iwokrama rainforests in Guyana for its reptiles and amphibians for the start of my PhD research. I caught this whipsnake one night along the Essequibo river and brought it back to camp to collect a DNA sample. I took this photo the following day as I was trying to release it and it clearly shows the attitude that is common with the genus. Instead of slithering off, it decided to turn towards me and rear up. Never trying to miss a good photo opportunity, I quickly dropped to its level and snapped this photo with my Nikon D300 and my Sigma 17-50mm at 50mm, f/4, 1/125s, and ISO 200.” – Andrew Snyder

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Flickr Photo Review – Image by Pete Withers – Butterfly

Below is an image submitted by one of our flickr members, Pete Withers, of an artistically positioned butterfly.

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  • Notes From the Field: “I had seen this pupa a couple of days previous so was checking on it regularly. When I found on this occasion the butterfly must have just recently emerged and was upside down drying itself and filling its wings ready for its first flight. The Butterfly is actually hanging but I felt it looked better rotated to appear sitting. This particular species is a high flying butterfly and very hard to photograph normally, but as this one had just emerged it wasn’t in a position to take flight.  I consider myself very lucky to have witnessed and photographed this wonderful butterfly.” – Pete Withers


Editor’s Review:

“I really like this shot. It takes a simple composition and brings it to life through color and lighting. The sharpness in focus and narrow depth of field also brings out the details in the butterfly’s spectacular body. I also like the crispness of the plant the butterfly is resting upon. Nice perspective!” – Steve Freligh

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Flickr Photo Review – Image by Lisa Franceski – Common Terns

Below is an image submitted by one of our flickr members, Lisa Franceski, of a Common Tern mother and young.

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Visit Lisa Franceski’s flickr photostream

  • Notes From the Field: “This photograph was taken last year when I first got my camera (Canon T2i) and Sigma lens 120-400mm. The Common Tern family you see here is the family I followed from the time they hatched until the time they fledged. Both parents were successful in raising these juveniles. They were able to hunt for themselves prior to migration in September at Nickerson Beach in Long Island. I lay down on my belly in the sand to shoot these birds only because I find it that it is less intrusive when you approach on your belly than to walk straight up with a tripod. I use manual settings and I manually focus. The settings were: 1/1250s; f/7.1 and iso of 400. No flash was used. After studying this particular Common Tern family day after day, I believe the parents were used to my presence as they became worn juveniles. This happens to be one of my favorites from my early learning photography days. The photograph captures the demanding Common Tern juvenile and the hurried rush of the parent to feed him. I named this juvenile ‘Kiwi’ and he had a sister named ‘Peanut.’ What I find amusing is that everyone was quite interested in how they were progressing during my documentary of their growth.” – Lisa Franceski


Editor’s Review:

“Great “eye to eye” perspective and a beautifully artistic shot with the curving body of the fish about to be served. The shallow depth of field also helps center my attention on the action that is taking place. Lighting is perfect to deliver a powerful and enjoyable image.” – Steve Freligh

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